CoolData blog

20 January 2018

Download my free handbook on predictive modeling

CoolDataBook

I like to keep things simple, so here’s the gist: I wrote another book. It’s free. Download it here.

 

The title says it all: “Cool Data: A how-to guide for predictive modeling for higher education advancement and nonprofits using multiple linear regression in Data Desk.” It’s a 190-page “cookbook,” a guide for folks who aren’t looking for deep understanding of stats, regression, or even predictive modelling, but just enough knowledge — a recipe, really — to mine the value in their organizations’ databases. It’s the kind of book I would have loved to have when I was starting out.

 

Take a look, dive in if it’s your thing, share it with someone who might be interested.

 

I remember talking about the idea as long ago as 2010. I wanted to write something not too technical, yet valid, practical, and actionable. On getting into it I quickly realized that I couldn’t talk about multiple linear regression without talking about how to clean, transform, and prepare data for modelling. And I couldn’t talk about data prep without talking about querying a database. As a result, a large portion of the book is an introduction to SQL; again, not a deep dive into writing queries, but just enough for a motivated person to learn how to build an analysis-ready file.

 

I don’t have to sell you on it, though, because it’s free — download it and do whatever you want with it. If it looks interesting to you, buy the Data Desk software and work through the book using the sample data and your own data. (Be sure to check back for updates to the book which may be necessary as the Data Desk software continues to evolve.) And, of course, consider getting training, preferably one-on-one.

 

Unlike this handbook, Data Desk and training are not free, but they’re investments that will pay themselves back countless times over — if you stick with it.

 

 

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10 October 2012

Logistic vs. multiple regression: Our response to comments

Guest post by John Sammis and Peter B. Wylie

Thanks to all of you who read and commented on our recent paper comparing logistic regression with multiple regression. We were not sure how popular this topic would be, but Kevin told us that interest was high, and there were a number of comments and questions. There were several general themes in the comments; Kevin has done an excellent job responding, but we thought we should throw in our two cents.

Why not just use logistic?

The point of our paper was not to suggest that logistic regression should not be used — our point was that multiple regression can achieve prediction results quite similar to logistic regression. Based on our experience working with and training fundraising professionals getting introduced to analytics, logistic regression can be intimidating. Our goal is always to get these folks to use analytics to help with their fundraising initiatives. We find many of them catch on with multiple regression, and much less so with logistic regression.

Predicted values vs. probabilities

We understand that the predicted values generated by multiple regression are different from the probabilities generated by logistic regression. Regardless of the statistic modeling technique we use, we always bin the raw prediction or probability values into equal-sized score levels. We have found that score level bins are easier to use than raw values. And using equal-sized score levels allows for easier evaluation of the scoring model.

“I cannot agree”

Some commenters, knowledgeable about statistics, said they would not use multiple regression when the inputs called for logistic. According to the rules, if the target variable is binary, then linear modelling doesn’t make sense — and the rules must be obeyed. In our view, this rigid approach to method selection is inappropriate for predictive modelling. The use of multiple linear regression in place of logistic regression may not always make theoretical sense, but predictive modellers are concerned with whether or not a model produces an output that is useful in practical terms. The worth of a model is testable against new, real-world data, therefore a model has only one criterion for determining “appropriate” use: Whether it really predicts what the modeler claims it will predict. The truth is revealed during evaluation.

A modest proposal

No one reading this should simply take our word that these two dissimilar methods yield similar results. Neither should anyone dismiss it out of hand without providing a critique based on real data. We would encourage anyone to try doing something on your own with data using both techniques and show us what you find. In particular, graduate students looking for a thesis or dissertation topic might consider producing something under this title: “Comparing Logistic Regression and Multiple Regression as Techniques for Predicting Major Giving.”

Heck! Peter says that if anyone were interested in doing a study like this for a thesis or dissertation, he would be willing to offer advice on how to:

  1. Do a thorough literature review
  2. Formulate specific research questions
  3. Come up with a study design
  4. Prepare a proposal that would satisfy a thesis or dissertation committee.

That’s quite an offer. How about it?

18 April 2012

Stepwise, model-foolish?

Filed under: Model building, Pitfalls, regression, Software, Statistics — Tags: , — kevinmacdonell @ 8:00 am

My approach to building predictive models using multiple linear regression might seem plodding to some. I add predictor variables to the regression one by one, instead of using stepwise methods. Even though the number of predictor variables I use has greatly increased, and the time needed to build a model has lengthened, I am even less likely to use stepwise regression today than I was a few years ago.

Stepwise regression, available in most stats software, tosses all the predictor variables into the analysis at once and picks the best for you. It’s a semi-automated process that can work forwards or backwards, adding or deleting variables until it’s satisfied a statistical rule of thumb. The software should give you some control over the process, but mostly your computer is making all the big decisions.

I understand the allure. We’re all looking for ways to save time, and generally anything that automates a repetitive process is a good thing. Given a hundred variables to choose from, I wouldn’t be surprised if my software was able to get a better-fitting model than I could produce on my own.

But in this case, it’s not for me.

Building a decent model isn’t just about getting a good fit in terms of high R square. That statistic tells you how well the model fits the data that the model was built on — not data the model hasn’t yet seen, which is where the model does its work (or doesn’t). The true worth of the model is revealed only over time, but you’re more likely to succeed if you’ve applied your knowledge and judgement to variable selection. I tend to add variables one by one in order of their Pearson correlation with the target variable, but I am also aware of groups of variables that are highly correlated with each other and likely to cause issues. The process is not so repetitive that it can always be automated. Stepwise regression is more apt to select a lot of trivial variables with overlapping effects and ignore a significant predictor that I know will do the job better.

Or so I suspect. My avoidance of stepwise regression has always been due to a vague antipathy rather than anything based on sound technical concerns. This collection of thoughts I came across recently lent some justification of this undefined feeling: Problems with stepwise regression. Some of the authors’ concerns are indeed technical, but the ones that resonated the most for me boiled down to this: Automated variable selection divorces the modeler from the process so that he or she is less likely to learn things about their data. It’s just not as much fun when you’re not making the selections yourself, and you’re not getting a feel for the relationships in your data.

Stepwise regression may hold appeal for beginning modellers, especially those looking for push-button results. I can’t deny that software for predictive analysis is getting better and better at automating some of the most tedious aspects of model-building, particularly in preparing and cleaning the data. But for any modeller, especially one working with unfamiliar data, nothing beats adding and removing variables one at a time, by hand.

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