CoolData blog

Presentations and so on

UPCOMING

22-24 April 2014: Annual National Conference of the Canadian Association of Gift Planners (CAGP), Halifax NS. I’ll talk to Planned Giving professionals about how to work with their data to identify the engagement factors most closely associated with likelihood to make a bequest — it’s not just about being a consistent, loyal donor. Consistent giving is a characteristic of many expectancies, but a database contains many other predictors as well which are too good to ignore.

May 2015: I’ll be presenting in Kingston ON early in May … Details coming soon.

PAST

Most recent to earliest:

3 October 2014: APRA Illinois’ Fall Conference, Chicago IL  (Loyola University Chicago, Water Tower Campus, Regents Hall) “Score! Live and in person: Peter Wylie and Kevin MacDonell.” The co-authors of “Score! Data-Driven Success for Your Advancement Team”, published earlier this year, presented a workshop combining an overview of the key concepts of data mining with a live demonstration of the creation of a predictive model for propensity to give. This demo employed a statistical software program and real data sets provided by workshop attendees. The demo encompassed the full range of modeling tasks, from evaluating the integrity of the data to outputting predictive scores for identifying new major gift prospects.

7-9 May 2014: CASE Institute for Senior Advancement Services Professionals, Fort Lauderdale FL.  I attended this event primarily to learn, but I also signed copies of “Score! Data-driven success for your Advancement Team” during a break between sessions.

21-22 February 2013: I made a return visit to the DRIVE conference in Seattle, (Data, Reporting, Information, and Visualization Exchange). Session, “The ‘Analytic’ Investment”. Analytics and data-driven decision making is a journey, not a destination, and there are often more questions than answers. How is analytics going to change the game? What are the potential downsides and conflicts? What are the right conditions for moving forward? Can we just dip a toe in the water, or is it all-or-nothing? Will investing in specialized skills for one or two employees create new vulnerabilities? As professionals, will it impede our careers to not pursue new data skills? Will the return on investment be worth it? And finally, what is the cost to our organizations of not investing in analytics? (55 minute presentation – click here for video)

10-12 October 2012: I was a member of an “Ask the Experts” panel at the national conference of the Canadian Chapter of the Association of Prospect Researchers for Advancement (APRA Canada), in Toronto ON. The theme of the conference was Leading Discovery.

26-27 October 2011: DRIVE 2011- Data, Reporting, Information, and Visualization Exchange, Bell Harbor International Conference Center, Seattle, WA. I spoke again on the theme of “This data is different,” explaining what I see is the difference between “everyday data” (such as data used for reporting) and “insight data” (the data used for predictive modeling). Everyday data and insight data have the same sources and look much the same, but insight data requires a whole different mindset. As well, because the creation and storage of insight data may not produce payoffs for decades, it is always at risk of being lost. I will speak about our responsibilities around protecting insight data as an institutional asset, and how we can nudge our organizations towards data-driven decision making. (60 minute presentation – click here for video.)

27-29 April 2011: CASE Institute for Senior Advancement Services Professionals, Baltimore, Md. I presented the luncheon keynote on the theme of “This data is different.” Interest in data mining for nonprofit fundraising is at an all-time high, but interest has not necessarily been converted into action. Advancement Services personnel are uniquely qualified to either lead the charge for analytics, or be a catalyst for its development. Taking the next step requires some changes in how we think about data. I offered concrete examples of how predictive modeling is applied in fundraising, and offered thoughts on fostering an analytics-focused culture. (45 minute presentation.)

24 February 2011: Presentation on data mining for Planned Giving, Halifax NS. Hosted by Canadian Association Gift Planners (CAGP). An introduction to predictors of Planned Giving potential that go beyond the conventional wisdom on prospect identification, i.e., focusing on consistent loyal donors. Consistent giving is a characteristic of many expectancies, but a database contains many other predictors as well which are too good to ignore. (30 minute presentation plus Q&A).

13-15 October 2010: APRA-Canada National Conference, Toronto ON. Co-presented a Data Mining Workshop with Peter Wylie. This workshop combined an overview of the key concepts of data mining with a live demonstration of the creation of two predictive model for propensity to give. The demo employed a statistical software program and real data sets provided by workshop attendees. The demo encompassed the full range of modeling tasks, from evaluating the integrity of the data to outputting predictive scores for identifying new major gift prospects. (Half-day workshop.)

21-22 July 2010: Data Analytics Symposium, Anaheim CA. This year APRA International bundled this great symposium with its annual national conference. My session, “Using survey data in your models”, explored the powerful predictive value inherent in survey data gathered by institutions, usually to serve purposes other than data mining. The primary focus was on one Canadian university’s participation in a national benchmarking study of alumni engagement. Points covered include survey design, survey delivery, and using the resulting data in regression analysis, including some specific examples of predictors and simple approaches for dealing with missing data. (90 minute presentation.)

21-24 July 2010: APRA’s 23rd Annual International Conference, Anaheim CA. I presented in the Data Analytics/Prospect Identification Track on Saturday, July 24. “Regression for Beginners” was aimed at researchers familiar with the simple scoring method for predictive models (a la Peter Wylie’s “Data Mining for Fundraisers”). This session looked at some of the limitations of the simple-score method and suggested the use of multiple linear regression. Intended only as an introduction to more advanced techniques, this session covered topics such as data preparation, correlation, and computing predictive scores. Minimal knowledge of statistics required. (90 minute presentation.)

21-23 April 2010: Association of Fundraising Professionals Maritime Fundraising Conference, Halifax NS.Basic data-mining techniques for Annual Fund, including a live demo of creating a predictive score using the stats software package Data Desk. (90 minute workshop)

29 March 2010: Introduction to data mining for universities and non-profits, hosted by Dalhousie University, focusing on models built for Phonathon, Planned Giving interest, and Event Attendance Likelihood. (90 minute presentation)

July 2009: Workshop on data mining for Annual Giving, for staff at University of Prince Edward Island. Phonathon, Planned Giving. (Full day workshop.)

1 Comment »

  1. [...] A list of upcoming and past events is available on THIS PAGE. Comments [...]

    Pingback by Where you’ll find me « CoolData blog — 1 April 2010 @ 7:37 am


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