CoolData blog

19 August 2014

Score! … As pictured by you

Filed under: Book, Peter Wylie, Score! — Tags: , , — kevinmacdonell @ 7:25 pm
2014-07-18 06.41.41

Left to right: Elisa Shoenberger, Leigh Petersen Visaya, Rebekah O’Brien, and Alison Rane in Chicago. (Click for full size.)

During the long stretch of time that Peter Wylie and I were writing our book, Score! Data-Driven Success for Your Advancement Team, there were days when I thought that even if we managed to get the thing done, it might not be that great. There were just so many pieces that needed to fit together somehow … I guess we each didn’t want to let the other down, so we plugged on despite doubts and delays, and then, somehow, it got finished.

Whew, I thought. Washed my hands of that! I expected I would walk away from it,  move on to other projects, and be glad that I had my early mornings and weekends back.

That’s not what happened.

These few months later, my eye will still be caught now and then by the striking, colourful cover of the book sitting on my desk. It draws me to pick it up and flip through it — even re-read bits. I find myself thinking, “Hey, I like this.”

Of course, who cares, right? I am not the reader. However, whatever I might think about Score!, it has been even more gratifying for Peter and I to hear from folks who seem to like it as much as we do. How fun it has been to see that bright cover popping up in photos and on social media every once in a while.

I’ve collected a few of those photos and tweets here, along with some other images related to the book. Feel free to post your own “Score selfies” on Twitter using the hashtag #scorethebook. Or if you’re not into Twitter, send me a photo at kevin.macdonell@gmail.com.

Click here to order your copy of Score! from the CASE Bookstore.

2014-08-14 06.34.25

jen

Jennifer Cunningham, Senior Director, Metrics+Marketing for the Office of Alumni Affairs, Cornell University. @jenlynham

Click here to order your copy of Score! from the CASE Bookstore.

While we would like for you to buy it, we would LOVE for you to read it and put it to work in your shop. Your buying it earns us each enough money to buy a cup of coffee. Your READING it furthers the reach and impact of ideas and concepts that fascinate us and which we love to share.

22 April 2014

Score! ships tomorrow

Filed under: Book, Score! — Tags: , , — kevinmacdonell @ 7:29 pm

scoreThe printer delivered early, and a copy of Score! showed up at CASE headquarters in Washington DC this afternoon.

(Doug Goldenberg-Hart, CASE’s Director, Editorial Projects sent this photo to prove it.)

To everyone who put in an advance order, your copy will be available to ship tomorrow (Wednesday).

Peter Wylie and I sincerely hope you enjoy it.

Click here to order.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23 December 2013

New from CASE Books: Score!

Filed under: Book, CoolData, Peter Wylie — Tags: , , , — kevinmacdonell @ 9:39 am

CASE_coverAs the year draws to a close, I’m pleased to announce that the book I’ve co-written with Peter Wylie will be available in January. ‘Score!’ joins a host of fine publications in CASE’s new catalog. I’m looking forward to having a look through this catalog for new books for the office. (‘Score’ is featured on page 12.)

So what is this new book about? The full title is Score!: Data-Driven Success for Your Advancement Team, and as a recent of issue of BriefCASE notes: “Kevin MacDonell and Peter Wylie walk readers through compelling arguments for why an organization should adopt data-driven decision-making as well as explanations of basic issues such as identifying and mining the pertinent data and what operations to perform once that data is in hand.”

You can read the rest of that article here: Ready to Score!?

20 August 2013

A book cover for “Score!”

Filed under: Book, Peter Wylie — Tags: , — kevinmacdonell @ 4:45 am

It has been a long time since I’ve offered an update on “Score!”, the forthcoming book I have co-authored with Peter Wylie. I apologize for that.  I do hope that readers who have known about this project for some time will feel that it is worth the wait. The revised date of availability is sometime this fall. (If you like instant gratification from your work, I would suggest you avoid the world of book publishing.)

We do have a cover image to show you. I like the funky colours.

Score_cover

27 December 2012

Holiday indulgence

Filed under: Book, CoolData, Off on a tangent — Tags: , — kevinmacdonell @ 4:35 pm

I’ve always tried to stay on-topic with CoolData content: If you subscribe, you know what you’re getting, and if you lose interest and unsubscribe, you know what you’re missing. But I’m on holiday, so I’m inclined to let content rules slip a bit. My wife and I are spending time with family on Cape Breton Island and in the Annapolis Valley in Nova Scotia. I’m less vigilant than usual about what I eat (more turkey, more sweets, more wine) and what I do (nothing, essentially). It is in this state of desuetude that I write this last blog post of the year.

Allow me to indulge by writing not about predictive analytics, but about CoolData itself, which has just turned three years old. That’s middle age for a blog, I figure. First I’ll go through some numbers, and then I’ll tell you about some things coming in the new year.

CoolData by the numbers

As of yesterday, CoolData has had 177,915 page views since it was launched. The number of visitors continues to grow gradually; 6,000 page views a month is the current average. These are page views, not unique visitors: WordPress has been informing me about unique visits only since early December. So far, each unique visitor averages 1.4 page views.

Visits have come from almost every country in the world, but of course most are from the United States. It is not unusual for my own country, Canada, to be edged out of second place by the UK, India or Australia on any given day. The top 20 or so countries since February 2012 are included in the WordPress-created graphic below. (Click for full size.)

countries

These visitor numbers are not small, but I’m not pretending they’re impressive, either. My subject is rather niche. As well, many visitors aren’t really looking for CoolData. Half of my traffic comes from people stumbling in from Google and other search engines, and they’re looking for simple (or simplistic) explanations of statistical concepts. The most popular post by far is How high, R squared? — published in April 2010, it is still heavily visited every day by confused and desperate grad students from all corners of the globe. I don’t consider these people part of the CoolData “tribe”, if I can call it that.

The tribe — the readers I care most about — are typically the ones who have subscribed to receive updates. (There are also a lot of RSS subscribers — I don’t have as good a handle on those numbers.*) As of today, there are 680 subscribers — 48 subscribers via WordPress accounts, and 632 via email. This number has been growing very gradually over the past three years. I realize many people sign up for things they never return to (I do it all the time), but when an update goes out, I estimate that about half of my subscribers click through to the new post, which I find encouraging. They are far more likely to click through than my followers on Twitter (@kevinmacdonell).

Most readers visit during the work week (readership drops off dramatically on weekends), so not surprisingly most subscribers use their real work address rather than a free Gmail, Hotmail, or Yahoo account. From my own research, I know providing a work email is associated with higher levels of engagement, and “.edu” addresses alone (US-affiliated higher ed institutions) account for 293 subscribers. Another 101 addresses have the less restrictive top-level domain of “.org”. Among country-specific top-level domains, the top ones are Canada (.ca) with 46 and the United Kingdom (.uk) with 29. There are 142 “.com” addresses, and roughly half of them are Gmail, Yahoo or Hotmail. There are 443 unique domains in all, the top ones being uw.edu (University of Washington) and ubc.ca (University of British Columbia).

Start writing!

Up to now I’ve been coy about answering questions about my stats, for no real reason. I figure I might as well come clean. I have long felt that there is more room for writing on this topic, so if knowing more about my readership encourages you to start your own blog, then I encourage you to make 2013 your year to step up. All it takes is a few minutes to sign up on WordPress or similar free service, and start writing.

If you’re not up for creating your own blog, then consider writing a guest post for CoolData. Up to this point, guest posting has been by invitation only, but starting today I am open to receiving post ideas from anyone interested in writing on the topic of predictive analytics for nonprofit fundraising or higher education advancement (including alumni engagement). I plan to limit submitted guest posts to one per month. Multiple submissions are welcome, but submissions that are completely off-topic will not get a response. Email me at kevin.macdonell@gmail.com to suggest/discuss your idea before you start writing.

No more comments

As I begin a new year, naturally I think of changes I’d like to make. For one, I will be taking a new approach to comments on posts. Only 514 comments have been contributed since December 2009, and 140 of those are mine. This is not a disappointment — I had no designs one way or the other — but the time has come to recognize the fact that CoolData has never been effective as a discussion forum. There have been a few good questions and observations made by commenters, but unfortunately too many comments are of the “drive-by” variety: Brief one-off criticisms that require rebuttal but never lead to any forward advance in the discussion or added enlightenment for beginning predictive modelers. The best questions, the most honest comments, and the most well-reasoned objections tend to come to me via private email.

For that reason, I am shutting off the ability to respond with public comments. There have been no nasty personal attacks, nor abusive language, nor anything I’ve felt forced to delete (aside from spam). I simply feel that, after three years of writing and editing this blog, I no longer feel the need to provide a platform for people whose main interest is something other than being part of a shared endeavour to learn, to grow, and to bring our institutions and organizations into the age of data. Responses, questions, critiques are always welcome via private email, and I may choose to gather the best responses for use in followup blog posts. Keep in mind, too, that the best forums for discussion are still the listservs (Prospect-dmm is the best example), and new conversations crop up every week in the many groups of interest you can find on social networking sites such as LinkedIn.

SCORE!

On a more positive note, 2013 will be the year that a new book, Score!, which I have co-written with Peter Wylie, will be published. I’ve said very little about it to date, in part because I won’t actually believe it until it’s in my hands. It’s a project with a long gestation … writing a book has nearly nothing in common with knocking off a blog post. However, I’m confident we’ll see it out sometime during the first half of the year.

That’s all for 2012. Best of luck in your data-related work in 2013!

{}{}{}{}{}{}{}{}

* A regular reader who subscribes via RSS reminded me that I have given short shrift to the RSS crowd — I just don’t know how many subscribe via RSS. It is quite possible, then, that I am overestimating the number of email subscribers who click through to the post.

11 January 2012

The data-driven organization: Know any?

Filed under: Book — kevinmacdonell @ 11:59 am

I was chatting with Peter Wylie the other day, which we do from time to time, since we are, after all, collaborating on a book which we hope to finish writing in the coming months. The book is about how to bring our institutions, nonprofits, development and advancement offices into the data-driven decision making age.

We got to thinking, are there any institutions (universities, or university advancement departments, or nonprofit organizations) that are  shining examples of data-driven decision making? Is there anyone we can profile in the book as an exemplar?

We can name plenty of data-oriented people who are doing great work as individuals. But what about institutions or departments as a whole? Are there any that employ analytics from top to bottom? Are there any that pass all decision-making processes through a layer of data analysis (if appropriate) before the final stage is reached?

We struggled to come up with non-profit examples. Can you help? Tell us about the organization you’d nominate as data-driven — perhaps it’s your own. Be prepared to explain why. You can remain anonymous, although we would prefer to be able to identify persons and institutions by name. Email me at kevin.macdonell@gmail.com.

Older Posts »

The Silver is the New Black Theme. Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,066 other followers